Gluten Free • Paleo • Sugar Free • Dairy Free

Cassava Flour Pancakes

Cassava Flour Pancakes (2)

There are a few things that have eluded me in my quest for healthier baking. Using Gluten Free and Paleo baking ingredients can cause a chemical dilemma when trying to achieve the same texture and taste as a ‘normal flour’. We eat with our emotions as much as our mouths and our memories of how a particular food tastes, feels and looks influences how we will enjoy a dish. That’s always been my aim; to create desserts and treats that look and (most importantly) taste like what you remember and expect.

There are some foods that I have struggled to recreate with the success that I require in order to share a recipe with you. Scones, Dumplings and Pancakes have been my nemesis for many years. Arrowroot made them too heavy, Nut Meal made them too coarse and Coconut Flour was too fine. Trust me; there have been many, many failed experiments, but I think I have now found the answer!

Cassava Flour Pancakes (11)

Cassava Flour Pancakes (7)

I recently received a pack of Otto’s Cassava Flour from Pantry Innovations and was intrigued. Cassava Flour is made from the same root vegetable as Arrowroot/Tapioca (the Cassava), however Arrowroot has been bleached and then the starch extracted. Alternatively, Otto’s Cassava Flour is a whole food; the entire root, minus the peel. It has the same texture as regular flour and even looks the same. The manufacturers of Otto’s Cassava Flour claim that it can be used 1:1 in place of normal flours in most baking recipes without (or limited) recipe adaptations. This I had to try!!!

Otto's Naturals

First up was Cassava Flour Pancakes: perfect, fluffy and texturally right pancakes served with raspberry sauce.
Next Pizza Bases: thin and crispy without any sogginess.
Then two more lots of Pancakes…
Lastly: Sponge Cakes that were light and just like Grandmas used to make.
And then with the tiny amount I had left I made some more pancakes because nothing beats pancakes for breakfast!

Cassava Flour Pancakes (1)

I found when baking with Cassava Flour it was a little bit ‘thirsty’ and required the addition of a small extra amount of liquid compared to a standard wheat flour recipe. It did cook up just like a normal wheat flour and was simple and uncomplicated to work with.

Cassava Flour Pancakes (9)

How does it compare to other non-traditional flours? At first glance a packet seems to be on the more expensive side but it works out to be roughly the same as Almond Meal. It has a more neutral flavour and texture than the coarseness of most nut meals and is far easier to use than Coconut Flour. It is quite different in cooked texture than its ‘sister flour’ Tapioca (which tends to thicken and be quite heavy) and is much better suited to traditional baking.

And the Cassava Flour Pancakes? Gone quicker than I could cook them. That’s always the best indication! Otto’s Cassava Flour can be purchased exclusively in Australia from Pantry Innovations or in the USA from Ottos Naturals.

NB: I did receive a complimentary bag of Otto’s Cassava Flour from Pantry Innovations to test and create, and I am so thankful that I did! These Cassava Flour Pancakes are the best!

Cassava Flour Pancakes (15)

Cassava Flour Pancakes (13)

Cassava Flour Pancakes
Serves 2
These pancakes are made usng Otto's Cassava Flour and taste just like 'regular' pancakes. They are fluffy, light and so tasty!
Write a review
Print
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
INGREDIENTS
  1. 1 Cup Cassava Flour (do not substitute other flours as it will not work)
  2. 2 Tablespoons Coconut Sugar (or other granulated sugar)
  3. 2 teaspoons Baking Powder
  4. 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  5. 1 1/4 Cups Milk (of choice)- have extra on hand if you prefer your pancakes thinner
  6. 2 Tablespoon Oil (of choice; melted if coconut oil)
  7. 1 Egg
Optional Add ins
  1. Chocolate Chips, Berries
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Whisk the wet ingredients together in a seperate bowl.
  3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet nad whisk/stor until just combined (do not over mix).
  4. Allow the pancake batter to rest for 5-30 minutes (depending on how hungry you are).
  5. Heat a fry pan over medium heat and grease well (if using add in's gently stir them in now).
  6. Take 1/4 Cup of pancake batter and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until bubbles form on the surface of the pancake. Flip the pancake and cook until the other side is cooked.
  7. The batter should make approximately 8 pancakes.
  8. Serve with raspberry sauce, maple syrup, honey, fruit or icecream.
Mummy Made.It - Gluten Free, Paleo Desserts http://mummymade.it/

 

16 Comments to Cassava Flour Pancakes

  1. I am impressed you kept trying until you found a recipe that worked. Like you, I have attempted many different substitutes for flour, but pretty well always find them too heavy and not enjoyable to eat. Will see if I can find me some of this Cassava Flour, gotta be honest, today is the first I have heard of it. Thanks for the intro.

    • I use a lot of tapioca flour to make wraps/pizza bases etc and found the cassava flour to be much finer and less ‘thickening’ in it’s cooking qualities.

    • You could swap the egg for a 1/4 cup of Banana/Apple Sauce to make it vegan friendly. I like to add my bananas, berries etc whilst I am cooking the first side so they are in the ‘middle’ when I flip it.

  2. These were very easy to make and tasty, but were gummy all the way through- like they weren’t cooked enough or something. Any tips on why this might be? Did I add too much liquid to the batter? I tried to make it a normal pancake batter consistency, but maybe with cassava flour it should be more thick?

    • I find that gummy texture quite common when using arrowroot but cassava flour is normally a bit finer (despite being Tom the same root). Maybe smaller, thinner pancakes and a touch extra milk.

      • I got the gummy effect as well. I added a bit more milk and tried using 1/8 cup of batter, and 1/16 cup, and spreading the batter to an almost crepe-like thickness. The thin crispy edges are just divine, but the slightly thicker center is still gummy. I even tried turning the heat to low and cooking longer, but just can’t shake the gumminess. Do you think using dairy milk instead of almond milk might help?

  3. I literally just made them and after six to eight different grain free pancakes I have experimented with…my son and I agree that this one is our absolute fave!!! I let the batter rest this morning for 20 minutes while I made my son’s lunch for school. Perfect timing. The pancakes were fluffy, light, golden brown, and tasted amazing with sliced strawberries on top.

  4. I am just recently experimenting with these grain free flours. I have to use grain free and dairy free, so wondered how almond milk would fare in this recipe. I just made some type of delicious wafer using half almond flour and half arrowroot with some baking powder. Just for experimental purposes I used a bit of yeast to offset the almond flavor. Now I am on to something as these little 50 cent size wafers were very tasty.

  5. I had the same problem as people above-super gummy pancakes and I ended up having to throw them all away! Wasted 3 cups of cassava flour (I usually triple recipes because there are 6 of us and I like to have them for later in the week). ;( Need a better recipe for cassava flour that isn’t gummy, but have yet to find one…

    • Thanks for the feedback Lauren. I’ve been doing lots of recipe testing with Cassavs Flour over the last week and have found it can be quite gummy in cakes. It can be a result of over mixing or too much liquid, but I think it may also be due to the starch properties of the Cassava Flour. I have now found that using other flours in conjunction with the Cassava Flour can help.
      I haven’t had my pancakes go gummy (yet!) but I’ll test the recipe adding some coconut flour to see if that helps.
      Adding Cocoa to Cassava Flour gets rid of the gummyness in my sponges and cakes. It may work in pancakes too. I’ll let tog know how I go.

Leave a Comment

CLOSE
CLOSE